New Canadians

Not everyone grows up around the water or takes swimming lessons. But almost everyone loves to be around the water. This is true of many new Canadians (those who weren't born in Canada), who are four times more likely to be unble to swim. New Canadian families need water safety tips and reminders in their own languages to help them understand risks and how to stay safe around the water.

Find more information about new Canadians in the Drowning Research section of this website.

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Here's what you need to know to have fun in the pools, lakes and rivers of Ontario:

  • Swim with a buddy - never alone
  • Learn to swim - it's a life skill!
    • adult and child swim lessons are available at your local pool at can be very affordable
  • Swim to Survive
    • At a minimum, learn the skills to achieve the Lifesaving Society's Swim to Survive standard - roll into deep water, tread for 1 minute and swim 50 m.
    • Learn as a family
  • Swim only in areas supervised by lifeguards.
  • Weak or non-swimmers should wear lifejackets. Ensure vigilant adult supervision in areas without lifeguards. In the backyard pool, designate an adult to be "on guard."
  • Parents, you are your child's lifeguard!

Tips, videos for parents, families and boaters in multiple languages to help everyone stay safe and have fun.

Tips for Parents of children under 5 in multiple languages.

Tips for Parents of children 5-12 in multiple languages.

Swim to survive videos in multiple languages.

Boating Safety tips in multiple languages.

Learn to Swim

Basic swimming ability is a fundamental requirement in any meaningful attempt to eliminate drowning in Canada. The Lifesaving Society offers training programs from learn-to-swim through advanced lifesaving, lifeguarding and leadership.

Our Swim for Life program stresses lots of in-water practice to develop solid swimming strokes and skills. We incorporate valuable Water SmartĀ® education that will last a lifetime.

Swim to Survive is a Lifesaving Society survival training program. Swim to Survive is not a subsititute for swimming lessons; instead, it defines the minimum skills needed to survive an unexpected fall into deep water. People of all ages should be able to perform the Society's Swim to Survive standard.